Cognitive therapy improves behavior issues in kids with night terrors

By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) – Young children who receive cognitive behavior therapy to help them cope with night terrors may have fewer behavior problems tied to poor sleep than kids who receive therapy that doesn’t include advice on how to manage symptoms, a recent study suggests. The study focused on 90 children, ages 4 to 6, with severe and persistent fears that interfere with normal functioning and cause considerable stress for kids and their families. Researchers randomly assigned the children into two groups.
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A year on, mothers of Brazil’s zika babies struggle

Paulo Sergio holds his six-month-old zika-affected baby as they wait for medical exams at the State Brain Institute (IEC) in Rio de JaneiroBrazil's 2015-2016 zika scare has largely dropped out of the headlines, but one year on, thousands of parents are struggling as they learn to care for brain-damaged babies. Brenda Pereira, 23, weeps in dismay as she leaves the doctor's room with her four-month-old daughter Maria Fernanda in her arms. The pediatrician has just told her that Maria Fernanda's case of microcephaly is worse than previously thought.

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Toddlers born by reproductive treatments develop normally

By Carolyn Crist (Reuters Health) – Children born through assisted reproductive technologies have similar cognitive, motor and language development at age two as those born through natural conception, according to a new Canadian study. Researchers saw no differences in skills such as movement, memory, exploration, vocabulary, word combination, and sensory and motor development. “Studies have shown that assisted reproductive technology (ART) use is increasing the risk of prematurity and major malformations,” said study author Anick Berard, research chair of Medications, Pregnancy and Lactation at the University of Montreal.
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Active kids less likely to be depressed later on

A boy jumps to save a goal while playing soccer on the beach in BenghaziBy Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) – Children who get more exercise may have fewer symptoms of depression than their peers who are less active, a recent study suggests. Researchers used activity trackers to see how much physical activity children got, then interviewed kids and their parents to assess whether kids had symptoms of depression. When kids got more moderate to vigorous physical activity at ages 6 and 8, they were less likely to have symptoms of major depressive disorder two years later, the study found.

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Natural progesterone could benefit women with recurrent pregnancy loss

Natural progesterone could benefit women with recurrent pregnancy lossNatural progesterone could help women who have suffered two or more unexplained miscarriages to have a successful pregnancy, according to a study published in the journal Fertility & Sterility. Around 25% of pregnant women suffer a miscarriage during the first trimester of pregnancy. For some women, unexplained miscarriages occur repeatedly with each of their pregnancies.

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Breastfed babies still need extra vitamin D

A mother breastfeeds her child as she joins dozens of mothers during a breastfeeding flash mob demonstration in Hong KongBy Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) – Many breastfed infants may not get enough vitamin D because their mothers prefer not to give babies supplement drops, a study suggests. Because breast milk typically doesn’t contain enough vitamin D to help infants develop healthy bones, the American Academy of Pediatrics advises nursing mothers to give their babies daily supplements of 400 IU (international units) of vitamin D. As an alternative, women can take vitamin D supplements themselves – typically 4,000 to 6,000 IU daily – to give babies enough in breast milk so that drops aren’t needed.

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Do rude parents mean worse care for babies?

Lots of previous research has shown that exposure to even mildly rude behavior can cause individuals to perform poorly on cognitive tasks, become less creative and flexible, and act less social and helpful, said lead study author Dr. Arieh Riskin of the University of Tel Aviv in Israel. “However, this current study is the first to demonstrate – what we all feel and know from our experience in our daily practice – that exposure to rudeness inflicted on medical teams by patients or families of patients significantly harm medical teams’ performance,” Riskin said by email. “Rudeness had adverse consequences not only on diagnostic and intervention parameters of medical care, but also on team processes – such as information and workload sharing, helping and communication – that are central to patient care,” Riskin added.
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Study links antacids in pregnancy to asthma in kids

Study links antacids in pregnancy to asthma in kidsChildren of women who take heartburn medicine during pregnancy are a third more likely to develop asthma, according to a study published Monday. "This association does not prove that the medicines caused asthma in these children," said Aziz Sheikh, co-director of the Asthma UK Centre for Applied Research at the University of Edinburgh and co-author of the study. Heartburn — discomfort caused by acid passing from the stomach up into the oesophagus — occurs frequently during pregnancy due to hormonal changes and pressure on the stomach from the expanding womb.

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Parents must play role in care of Nigeria’s freed Chibok girls – campaigners

Some of the 21 Chibok schoolgirls released by Boko Haram look on during their visit to meet President Muhammadu Buhari In Abuja, NigeriaBy Adaobi Tricia Nwaubani CHIBOK, Nigeria (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – The parents of the 21 Chibok schoolgirls freed by Boko Haram in October after two and a half years in captivity must be involved in the Nigerian government's efforts to care for the girls and reintegrate them into society, campaigners said on Friday. The girls were released after Switzerland and the International Red Cross brokered a deal with the jihadist group, and have since been held in a secret location in the capital Abuja for assessment and debriefing by the state. Aisha Muhammed-Oyebode of the Bring Back Our Girls (BBOG) campaign group called on the authorities to allow the freed girls to also be cared for by their families.

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Parents must play role in care of Nigeria’s freed Chibok girls: campaigners

By Adaobi Tricia Nwaubani CHIBOK, Nigeria (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – The parents of the 21 Chibok schoolgirls freed by Boko Haram in October after two and a half years in captivity must be involved in the Nigerian government’s efforts to care for the girls and reintegrate them into society, campaigners said on Friday. The girls were released after Switzerland and the International Red Cross brokered a deal with the jihadist group, and have since been held in a secret location in the capital Abuja for assessment and debriefing by the state. Aisha Muhammed-Oyebode of the Bring Back Our Girls (BBOG) campaign group called on the authorities to allow the freed girls to also be cared for by their families.
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